Tag Archives: Cross-Strait Relations

Taiwan’s Resurgent Assertiveness: A New Worry for Washington
Ted Carpenter argues that the contentious Taiwan issue has merely been slumbering during the presidency of Ma Ying-jeou, and it now shows signs of awakening as a part of Taiwan’s greater assertiveness toward Beijing – which also implicates the United States in their role as “protector.”
Sino-US Cross-Strait Strategic Stability: The Aircraft Carrier Factor
The recent landslide victory of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) has obvious implications for China-U.S. relations, and for a cross-strait standoff between the countries two militaries. Washington should preempt any possible cross-strait military build-up and engage in a sincere dialogue about the democratic future of Taiwan in a “one country, two systems” solution.
Xi Jinping Turns the Screws on Taiwan
Not unlike other authoritarian and totalitarian regimes throughout history, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has always had a paranoid streak, whose stridency has ebbed and flowed according to the times. In periods of high instability, such as during the Cultural Revolution, the CCP leadership went to extraordinary lengths to eliminate […]
Hardening Competition with China—Implications for US Taiwan Policy
As the rivalry between the United States and China in the Asia-Pacific continues, Taiwan will play an ever-increasing role in the Obama administration’s rebalance or pivot to the region. Robert Sutter explains recent congressional interest in Taiwan and lays out three reasons why existing U.S. policies will continue.
The Taiwan Issue Shows Signs of Re-Igniting
With tensions at a seemingly all time high in the Asia Pacific, cross-straits relations between mainland China and Taiwan remain positive and relatively peaceful. However, Ted Galen Carpenter posits that this quiet period may be coming to an end and the Taiwan issue could prominently reemerge in the near future.
Why Is Cross-Straits Communication Slowing Down
Consultation and negotiation are indispensable for the mainland’s ideal of solving the Taiwan issue through peaceful means, writes Zhu Songling.
To Abandon Taiwan or Not, That’s Not the Question
Following criticisms from international relations scholars like John Mearsheimer and Iskander Rehman, Xu Shiquan addresses the issue of Taiwan and China’s “one country two systems” policy to explain how the United States and China can find a win-win opportunity while avoiding conflict.
Zhang-Wang Meeting Helps Taiwan Cross-Straits Relations
The meeting between Zhang Zhijun and Wang Yu-chi could benefit cross-straits relations by promoting peace and open communication, but Zhu Songling also brings into question America’s involvement and how improving China-U.S. relations is crucial to maintaining this peace.
No Misleading Taiwan
Wu Zurong responds to Professor James Holmes’ article on Taiwan, arguing that a win-win outcome for the Taiwan Strait should replace Holmes’ strategy for “winning without fighting.”
The Implications of Improved Cross-Strait Relations for US Arms Sale to Taiwan
So long as the overall strength of the mainland continues to grow and cross-strait relations continue to improve, the day will come when the U.S. and Taiwan have to decide whether arms deals are still needed, writes Zhou Bo.
A Competitive Strategy for Taiwan
How can Taipei bring about stable, enduring deterrence across the Taiwan Strait? Jim Holmes discusses this question and other defense issues pestering cross-straight relations.
Tightrope Diplomacy: U.S. Arms Sales to Taiwan
Washington has made it a point to handle arms sales to Taiwan as delicately as possible. However, following a recent visit by Senator James Inhofe and other developments, the Obama administration is finding it more challenging to walk the diplomatic tightrope.
The World’s Wartime Debt to China
The Chinese contributions towards the allied victory of World War II are often overlooked and because of this China has seen little reward for its efforts since war’s end. However, modern ties with the west have opened the door for China to build on relationships, end lingering issues and gain true recognition for its contributions.
China Strives to Remove Tinderbox of Arms Sales to Taiwan
While unrealistic to expect the United State to suspend its arms sales to Taiwan, Liu suggests that the US and Chinese defense chiefs agree to build “a sustained, substantive military to military relationship” to bolster ties between the world’s two biggest economies.
Is it Time to Stop Arms Sales to Taiwan?
Thirty-four years after President Carter signed the Taiwan Relations Act, US arms sales to Taiwan continue to impede the positive development of Sino-US relations. However, with peaceful cross-Straits relations, Wu Zurong argues it’s time to stop interfering in China’s internal affairs and allow US relations with both China and Taiwan to flourish.
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