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Commentaries by Zach Montague

Zach Montague

News Assistant, New York Times

Zach Montague is a news assistant at The New York Times and a graduate of the China and Asia Pacific Studies program at Cornell. He has previously worked in Abu Dhabi, Beijing, and Shaanxi. Follow him on Twitter at @zjmontague
  • May 15 , 2018

    At its core, the current flare up in U.S.-China trade relations is only the latest episode in a long-running rivalry between the two sides in science and technology. Washington should take the present climate as an opportunity to engage China in a constructive way and look inward for ways to shore up its own tech sector.

  • Mar 15 , 2018

    China now has a fiercely effective group of elites running the country with an unprecedented ability to cut through red tape and enact policy rapidly. For better or worse, their vision for the future will be put in place more rapidly and efficiently than before, and this could mean many years of efficient and coherent governing ahead.

  • Jan 29 , 2018

    The fact that multiple cities and provinces in China are confessing to runaway data manipulation might strike some onlookers as bizarre. Major discrepancies between reported and actual growth in recent years would seemingly call into question even the most basic assumptions about the health of the Chinese economy and the trajectory of its growth.

  • Nov 22 , 2017

    At the 19th Party Congress, President Xi announced that China had “taken a driving seat in international cooperation to respond to climate change.” But as much as Beijing has done to get its own house in order domestically, it has hasn’t always let concern over climate change inform its trade policy or diplomacy. And while China is becoming a cleaner, lower-emissions country at a national level, it has done so by "outsourcing" emissions, both internally and overseas.

  • Oct 27 , 2017

    China seized global attention in September with the announcement that it had begun earnestly planning a ban on traditional gas-fueled vehicles. So far, no date has been set for the final cutoff, and important strategic details remain murky. But the decisiveness and finality of the announcement has animated environmentalists, investors and auto manufacturers, who sense a unique business opportunity.

  • Oct 27 , 2017

    China seized global attention in September with the announcement that it had begun earnestly planning a ban on traditional gas-fueled vehicles. So far, no date has been set for the final cutoff, and important strategic details remain murky. But the decisiveness and finality of the announcement has animated environmentalists, investors and auto manufacturers, who sense a unique business opportunity.

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