Language : English 简体 繁體
Foreign Policy
  • Han Liqun, Researcher, China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

    Apr 25, 2024

    Washington’s strategic misunderstanding of China is a crucial reason, if not the primary one, behind the troubles in China-U.S. relations. Social changes and other factors have long affected Washington’s perceptions of China, and many of these arise from chronic issues in U.S. politics. Currently, at least five factors are at play.

  • Li Yan, Deputy Director of Institute of American Studies, China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

    Apr 25, 2024

    The U.S. view of competition with China seems to boil down to different notions of what makes a good system of governance. In truth, however, the competition turns on fundamental national interests. By emphasizing ideology, the United States masks its pursuit of immediate interests and long-term dominance.

  • Warwick Powell, Adjunct Professor at Queensland University of Technology, Senior Fellow at Beijing Taihe Institute

    Apr 25, 2024

    The United States has intensified its efforts to assert or reclaim American Primacy in Asia. Assert if one holds the view that it still holds military preponderance; reclaim if one believes that it doesn’t. Through a series of so-called mini-lateral arrangements, the US has in recent years sought to enlist its Asia Pacific client states, former colonies and subimperial allies to anchor a 21st Century bulwark on the western edge of America’s Lake. The Quad, AUKUS and now the trilateral involving Japan and the Philippines form part of a lattice-like network, in all practical intents and purposes, aimed squarely at the containment of China.

  • Liu Chang, Assistant Research Fellow, Department for American Studies, CIIS

    Apr 23, 2024

    America is holding ASEAN countries back from a central role in its Indo-Pacific Strategy, but their self-confidence is growing. It’s not lost on anyone that Southeast Asia’s strategic position has not changed in the minds of U.S. decision-makers. Meanwhile, China offers welcome alternatives.

  • Yuan Sha, Associate Research Fellow, Department for American Studies, China Institute of International Studies

    Apr 23, 2024

    A floor needs to be established for bilateral interactions so that breakdowns can be avoided. In the post-Kissinger era, new interlocutors between Beijing and Washington are also needed — people who understand both countries and who can present creative ideas through safe channels.

  • Philip Cunningham, Independent Scholar

    Apr 19, 2024

    In early April, Presidents Joe Biden and Xi Jinping engaged in a phone call. While both sides have had differing takes on the same conversation, it’s undeniably beneficial for both leaders to engage in dialogue, particularly amidst tensions and significant areas of disagreement.

  • Brian Wong, Assistant Professor in Philosophy, HKU and Rhodes Scholar

    Apr 19, 2024

    ASEAN’s future seems bright, and both the U.S. and China want to court the region’s nations into partnerships. Neither side holds a clear advantage, though that may change after the U.S. election this year.

  • Zhao Minghao, Professor, Institute of International Studies, Fudan University, and China Forum Expert.

    Apr 19, 2024

    As if things were not complicated enough before, the political campaign season in the U.S. is upon us, with all its expected anti-China rhetoric. The recent visit to China of U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen applied some needed salve. She made measurable progress through frank discussions.

  • Yu Xiang, Senior Fellow, China Construction Bank Research Institute

    Apr 12, 2024

    The U.S. treasury secretary visited China recently, and by many measures it was successful. She demonstrated excellent public diplomacy and engaged in many healthy dialogues, which China welcomed. And yet the United States is the source of continued friction on many fronts.

  • Ma Xue, Associate Fellow, Institute of American Studies, China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations

    Apr 12, 2024

    In her recent visit, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen sought to establish a solid prerequisite for the development of relations between China and the United States. It’s a fine concept in theory, but the U.S. is making it difficult to accomplish in real life.

< 123456...310 >   To PageGo

Foreign Policy News

From trade to conflict, diplomacy to humanitarianism, China-US Focus traces the lines that connect the world’s nations. Reflecting our belief that the Chinese-American partnership is the most important bilateral relationship in the world, we produce close examinations of the events that shape the foreign policies of these countries. >>>
Back to Top