Language : English 简体 繁體
Foreign Policy
  • Zhou Xiaoming, Former Deputy Permanent Representative of China’s Mission to the UN Office in Geneva

    May 28, 2021

    Tariffs have ceased to be an effective bargaining chip for the United States as it seeks concessions from China. The effort at compulsion has been a miserable failure as China adapted effectively and U.S. consumers bore the costs. U.S. President Joe Biden should rethink his approach to relations.

  • Zhang Yun, Associate Professor, National Niigata University in Japan

    May 28, 2021

    The Biden administration is pushing a multilateralism based on shared ideals, alliances and partnerships. For the United States, only homogeneous countries can ensure quality and efficiency. But the differences between Chinese and U.S. understandings go beyond diplomatic practice. There are theoretical differences as well.

  • Yang Wenjing, Chief of US Foreign Policy, Institute of Contemporary International Relations

    May 28, 2021

    It’s no easy task to expel the No. 2 economy in the world from the international arena. The U.S. president must start with the common denominator, which is that China is, in fact, influential around the world and other countries are loath to attack it. He must engage with China and let it sit at the table.

  • Guo Chunmei, Associate Researcher, Institute of Southeast Asian and Oceanian Studies, CICIR

    May 28, 2021

    Counting on the United States to contain China has come at a heavy price. Worse, Australia’s strategic value as a middle power will be eroded dramatically if it continues to bash China in an era of uncertainty in which one can hear faint echoes of the drums of war.

  • Zhou Xiaoming, Former Deputy Permanent Representative of China’s Mission to the UN Office in Geneva

    May 27, 2021

    The three countries need to set aside their negative attitudes toward China. It can be done. Even at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union and United States cooperated to eradicate smallpox and polio worldwide. The same thing could happen again with today’s plague.

  • Doug Bandow, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute

    May 27, 2021

    The perception of righteous values and a sense of inflated confidence is hurting relations between the U.S. and China.

  • Sajjad Ashraf, Former Adjunct Professor, National University of Singapore

    May 27, 2021

    China’s upward trajectory can be seen most tangibly in its many investments in Africa - home to many of the world’s fastest growing economies. The U.S., fearful of being unseated as the world’s central power, has to play catch up on the continent.

  • Charles A. Kupchan, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University

    May 17, 2021

    As U.S. President Joe Biden contemplates course corrections after his first months in office, one change seems especially worthy of consideration: a shift to a more pragmatic, less ideological foreign policy.

  • Fu Ying, Chair, Center for International Security and Strategy, Tsinghua University

    May 17, 2021

    The principle should not be used to maximize the interests of any single party. When major countries follow the principles of multilateralism, they restrain themselves from seeking their own interests at the expense of others. Instead, they consider the overall good.

  • Wang Fan, Vice President, China Foreign Affairs University

    May 17, 2021

    Unlike Donald Trump’s brute force approach to China, President Joe Biden and his team will show more nuance, emphasizing intense long-term competition along with coexistence. The U.S. will compete, but it will weigh the costs and risks more carefully.

< 1...45678...254 >   To PageGo

Foreign Policy News

From trade to conflict, diplomacy to humanitarianism, China-US Focus traces the lines that connect the world’s nations. Reflecting our belief that the Chinese-American partnership is the most important bilateral relationship in the world, we produce close examinations of the events that shape the foreign policies of these countries. >>>
Back to Top